Book Review: Things We Do in the Dark by Jennifer Hillier

I received a review copy from the publisher. This does not affect the contents of my review and all opinions are my own.

Things We Do in the Dark bJennifer Hillier

Mogsy’s Rating: 5 of 5 stars

Genre: Mystery, Thriller

Series: Stand Alone

Publisher: Minotaur Books (July 19, 2022)

Length: 352 pages

Author Information: Website | Twitter

Things We Do in the Dark is my favorite Jennifer Hillier novel yet! It’s deeper, more suspenseful, more complex, and simply written at a much higher caliber of proficiency and detail. This one was a bit of a slow burn and took me down a few garden paths, but at the end of it all, I was blown away.

The book opens on a bloody scene in a bathroom of a mansion in Seattle. Paris Peralta is stunned as the police rush in, catching her holding a straight razor and standing over her husband Jimmy’s lifeless body in the tub, his femoral artery slashed open. Everyone believes she killed him for his money, Jimmy being a wealthy comedian and many decades her senior, but Paris insists she had been at a convention and returned home to find him already dead. It helps that her lawyer, Jimmy’s longtime friend Elsie Dixon, is also on her side, but there’s in fact one thing Paris fears more than being wrongfully accused. The death of a high-profile celebrity like Jimmy is bound to bring unwanted attention which spells very bad news for Paris, who has a secret and has been trying to lay low for a very long time.

The story next switches tack to follow journalist Drew Malcolm in Toronto. The host of a true crime podcast, he receives word that the notorious killer Ruby Reyes, known as the Ice Queen, is about to be freed on parole after twenty-five years behind bars. Having been roommates and good friends with Ruby’s daughter Joey a long time ago, Drew has a particular interested in the case. Sadly, Joey died in an accidental house fire many years before, and if there’s one thing Drew wants to do in honor or his friend’s memory, it is to ensure that her abusive mother’s true story comes to light.

I confess, when the book made the very abrupt transition in character POV and setting, it was quite jarring, and it almost felt like I was reading two different books. To be honest, it’s easy to lose track between the threads, forgetting about Paris as you’re reading about Drew, and with all the flashbacks to his and Joey’s past slipped in there too, I think this element of the novel’s structure will pose the biggest stumbling block for readers. However, if you can get past it to form the connections and read until the big reveal, all will be answered and it’s a hundred percent worth it.

This story is also dark. Real dark. Joey’s childhood with her awful mother and her mother’s string of even more awful boyfriends broke my heart. And the crime that brought Ruby Reyes before a court and sent to prison (and earned her the Ice Queen moniker) was so brutal and disturbing. The truth and everything that really happened will come out though, and the twisty and brilliant way Hillier laid out the plot and connected all the dots was absolute perfection. You’ll end up feeling for these characters, sympathizing with their pain and loneliness, the guilt and fear and the heartache. This might not be the author’s most thrilling and fast-moving book, but I’ve known her work to be extremely hard-hitting emotionally, and Things We Do in the Dark is perhaps the most impactful of all.

There’s also a more personal reason why I loved this book so much, and it’s because a huge chunk of it takes place in Toronto, the author’s hometown and mine as well. The city in the flashback sections was brought to life just as I remember it, from the well-manicured university grounds and off-campus housing along its side streets to the seedier parts of downtown with its strip clubs and street gangs. Hillier must have done a lot of extra research on top of her own experience and knowledge to fill in the gaps, making the story and the characters’ lives even more realistic.

In short, Things We Do in the Dark has it all—murder mysteries that span multiple places and time, family drama, and a heart wrenching tale of survival. So much love for this book and Jennifer Hillier!

Waiting on Wednesday 07/20/22

Waiting On Wednesday” is a weekly meme that first originated at Breaking the Spine but has since linked up with “Can’t Wait Wednesday” at Wishful Endings now that the original creator is unable to host it anymore. Either way, this fun feature is a chance to showcase the upcoming releases that we can’t wait to get our hands on!

Mogsy’s Pick

All Hallows by Christopher Golden (January 24, 2023 by St. Martin’s Press)

What can I say, I simply can’t resist a Halloween book, and the Stranger Things vibes certainly don’t hurt.

“With the 80’s nostalgia of Stranger Things, this horror drama from NYT bestselling author Christopher Golden follows neighborhood families and a mysterious, lurking evil on one Halloween day.

It’s Halloween night, 1984, in Coventry, Massachusetts, and two families are unraveling. Up and down the street, horrifying secrets are being revealed, and all the while, mixed in with the trick-or-treaters of all ages, four children who do not belong are walking door to door, merging with the kids of Parmenter Road. Children in vintage costumes with faded, eerie makeup. They seem terrified, and beg the neighborhood kids to hide them away, to keep them safe from The Cunning Man. There’s a small clearing in the woods now that was never there before, and a blackthorn tree that doesn’t belong at all. These odd children claim that The Cunning Man is coming for them…and they want the local kids to protect them. But with families falling apart and the neighborhood splintered by bitterness, who will save the children of Parmenter Road?

New York Times bestselling, Bram Stoker Award-winning author Christopher Golden is best known for his supernatural thrillers set in deadly, distant locales…but in this suburban Halloween drama, Golden brings the horror home.

All Hallows. The one night when everything is a mask…”

Book Review: Eversion by Alastair Reynolds

I received a review copy from the publisher. This does not affect the contents of my review and all opinions are my own.

Eversion by Alastair Reynolds

Mogsy’s Rating: 4 of 5 stars

Genre: Science Fiction

Series: Stand Alone

Publisher: Orbit (August 2, 2022)

Length: 432 pages

Author Information: Website

I confess, I haven’t had the best luck with Alastair Reynolds. I had the worst time with the first book I ever read by him (the title of which I can’t even remember anymore, it was that lackluster) so ever since then I’ve stayed far away.

But something about Eversion spoke to me. The book’s synopsis teased a sci-fi adventure across time and space, inviting readers to figure out a grand mystery. What does a sailing ship off the coast of Norway in the 1800s, a exploration zeppelin in the Antarctic in the 1900s, and a space ship seeking alien life in the far flung future all have in common?

For one, Dr. Silas Coade, a young assistant surgeon is at the head of all three narratives. Sailing on the Demeter, he first describes a treacherous journey through the icy narrow passages of the Norwegian straits as the expedition seeks a mysterious construct known as the Edifice. When disaster strikes, the Demeter meets the same fate as others ships that have attempted this doomed quest. Without skipping a beat though, readers next find Silas on a steamship, and next a dirigible, and finally on a spaceship. Basically, each time something terrible happens to end the expedition, but we always find ourselves in another time through the eyes of another incarnation of Dr. Silas Coade on a mission to search for the elusive Edifice. So just what is going on here?

Mind-bending does not even begin to describe Eversion. It’s definitely something special, and the entire plot is a puzzle to be solved. But even beyond that, there’s just an epicness to the difference pieces that make up this novel, from the harrowing maritime setting of the 1800s, to the steampunkish elements of adventure aboard an early twentieth century airship, and finally to the high-tech starship in the vast expanse of outer space. Even though there is a repetitiveness to the structure of the story, it grabbed me from page one. Obviously I cannot give away the answers, but I will say there are clues from the beginning that will make the gears in your head turn.

The characters also had such a big role to play in this. Silas is well-written and sympathetic. You only get to know a part of him when the book begins, but it’s enough to know that he’s a caring and dedicated doctor, well-liked among the crew. As the story progresses, we get to meet Silas in the other timelines and learn more about him as more of his personality and motives are revealed. And the beauty is that the full picture won’t be revealed until the very end.

Still, even when the mystery is solved, there is more. The final section of Eversion is probably the most rousing and exhilarating, thanks to the buildup of everything that came before. It gathers up all the threads and ties them up pretty well, and touches on some deeper philosophical themes about one’s existence and purpose.

Ultimately Eversion might not be anything like Reynolds’ space opera, but I honestly believe that’s to its advantage. This was a very clever and unique book and has single-handedly reawakened my interest in checking out more the author’s work.

Novella Review: A Prayer for the Crown-Shy by Becky Chambers

I received a review copy from the publisher. This does not affect the contents of my review and all opinions are my own.

A Prayer for the Crown-Shy by Becky Chambers

Mogsy’s Rating: 3 of 5 stars

Genre: Science Fiction

Series: Book 2 of Monk & Robot

Publisher: Tordotcom (July 12, 2022)

Length: 160 pages

Author Information: Website | Twitter

Another quiet read for your quiet moods, A Prayer for the Crown-Shy is very much in keeping with its predecessor A Psalm for the Wild-Built, though I’d say if you’re coming to this from book one, you’ll already know what to expect. Our story picks up from when readers last saw our protagonists, Sibling Dex and Mosscap. We find the tea monk and robot traveling through the inhabited areas of Panga, hoping to gain more knowledge of village life.

I’m not sure there’s much more to add to this brief description of the synopsis, or to my review of the first book, since so many of my comments there also apply here. What this sequel offers is not so much a plot as it is an observance of our characters simply existing, but to its credit I feel as though most of their philosophical dialogue and the story’s themes are elevated to a more profound place. We’re able to skip the lengthy introductions this time, exploring more significant developments in Dex and Mosscap’s relationship. The former has become something of a mentor as the latter continues to ponder the curious lives of humans with an almost child-like awe.

Because of its lack of a clear direction, however, I would say A Prayer for the Crown-Shy is even less structured than Psalm, and if you struggled with the first book, chances are you will experience the same issues with this one. These books are meant to appeal on a personal level, and I think it’s either something that will resonate with you strongly…or not at all.

Speaking for myself, I can appreciate what these Monk and Robot novellas are attempting to do, but this slow and introspective style of storytelling can only carry my enjoyment to a certain point and not beyond. I wasn’t bored, exactly, but I can’t say I was all that mentally stimulated either, though it was not for the author’s lack of trying. I respect Becky Chambers greatly for her thoughts and ideas, and she’s always a joy to read, but I have to say she’s much better at writing stories than she is at philosophizing. Especially coming from her Wayfarers series, the books of Monk and Robot feel very different, and probably should be considered more as parables.

That said, while I thought there were several interesting nuggets of world-building here and there, I didn’t think there was anything too groundbreaking or complex to the topics our protagonists discussed, and I also said so as much about the first book as well. Ultimately these novellas are too short for any real depth, though I will say they are quite good at being comfort reads. Although it left me wanting more, A Prayer for the Crown-Shy is the perfect bite-sized length for an afternoon dalliance and some food for thought, especially if you’re not feeling too committed.

More on The BiblioSanctum:
Review of A Psalm for the Wild-Built (Book 1)

Waiting on Wednesday 07/13/22

Waiting On Wednesday” is a weekly meme that first originated at Breaking the Spine but has since linked up with “Can’t Wait Wednesday” at Wishful Endings now that the original creator is unable to host it anymore. Either way, this fun feature is a chance to showcase the upcoming releases that we can’t wait to get our hands on!

Mogsy’s Pick

A Sleight of Shadows by Kat Howard (April 25, 2023 by Gallery/Saga Press)

At long last, a description and a cover to the sequel of An Unkindness of Magicians.

“Return to Kat Howard’s Alex Award–winning world begun in An Unkindness of Magicians, a secret society of power-hungry magicians in New York City.

After taking down the source of the corruption of the Unseen World, Sydney is left with almost no magical ability. Feeling estranged from herself, she is determined to find a way back to her status as one of the world’s most dangerous magicians. Unfortunately, she needs to do this quickly: the House of Shadows, the hell on earth that shaped her into who she was, the place she sacrificed everything to destroy, is rebuilding itself.

“The House of shadows sits on bones. All of the sacrifices, all of the magicians who died in Shadows, they’re buried beneath the foundations. Bones hold magic.”

The magic of the Unseen World is acting strangely, faltering, bleeding out from the edges. Determined to keep the House of Shadows from returning to power and to defeat the magicians who want nothing more than to have it back, Sydney turns to extremes in a desperate attempt to regain her sacrificed magic. She is forced to decide what she will give up and what she will lose and whether what must be destroyed is not only the House of Shadows, but the Unseen World itself.

World Fantasy Award finalist Kat Howard has written a sequel that asks how you have a happily ever in a world that doesn’t want it, where the cost of that happiness may be too much to bear.”

Audiobook Review: Daisy Darker by Alice Feeney

I received a review copy from the publisher. This does not affect the contents of my review and all opinions are my own.

Daisy Darker by Alice Feeney

Mogsy’s Rating (Overall): 4.5 of 5 stars

Genre: Thriller, Mystery

Series: Stand Alone

Publisher: Macmillan Audio (August 30, 2022)

Length: 10 hrs and 54 mins

Author Information: Website | Twitter

Narrators: Stephanie Racine

Alice Feeney said in the author’s note that Daisy Darker was the favorite of her novels, and after reading it, well, I guess I will have to share in that sentiment! It has a different feel than her previous books; rather than having a domestic psychological thriller vibe, this one was definitely more eerie and atmospheric. Despite a few over-the-top twists and some predictability, I found this to be a captivating and compulsive page-turner.

The eponymous protagonist of this novel, Daisy Darker, was born with a broken heart. Her cardiac deformity prevented her from going to school, hanging out with friends, or doing anything normal kids are supposed to do. It was just too risky, considering Daisy had had to be resuscitated from the brink of death multiple times before, spending months of her life recuperating in hospitals. As a result, she was never close to her two older sisters Rose and Lily, who were sent off to boarding school and were able to go off to live their lives. Daisy was never that close to her parents either. After their divorce, her composer dad was always on the road traveling with his orchestra and her flighty mom became distant, retreating into her own little world.

In fact, the only person Daisy was close to was her grandmother. Nana was an illustrator who made her name writing a children’s book inspired by her youngest granddaughter. During her childhood, Daisy loved to spend her summers at Seaglass, Nana’s huge gothic mansion situated on an island that was only accessible at low tide. And now she is back again, as an adult, here to celebrate her grandmother’s eightieth birthday on Halloween. Nana has invited the whole family, and it will be the first time in many years that the whole Darker clan has been together. There’s her son, Frank. His ex-wife, Nancy. Their three daughters, Daisy, Rose, and Lily. Lily’s teenage daughter, Trixie. And finally, Connor, a family friend whom they have all known since he was a boy.

The night before Nana’s big day though, a huge storm rolls in, cutting Seaglass off from the rest of civilization. And a few minutes after midnight, the house is awakened to a commotion. Daisy finds her grandmother at the foot of the stairs, dead from an apparent fall. But was it really an accident? And what is the meaning of the strange, ominous message on the wall above her body, written in chalk? Trapped on the island, there’s nowhere to run and no one to turn to for help. And as the night draws on, more bodies begin to pile up.

Intriguing doesn’t even begin to describe it. The characters are the best part of this novel, larger-than life figures against the backdrop of an old gothic house by the sea. Members of the Darker family feel just as nostalgic, even if most of them are downright repugnant. Most eccentric of all is probably Nana, a kind but iron-willed old lady who collects antique clocks and makes everyone clock in with a punch card every time they visit. The rest of her clan, however, are not quite as well put together. Frank’s orchestra is losing him more money than it takes in. Nancy is in love with only herself, never letting her ex-husband and their daughters forget that she could have been a movie star had she not gotten pregnant in her first year of college. Rose is a veterinarian who makes it clear she enjoys the company of her animals to that of people. Lily is a grown woman who still lives off of handouts from her parents and grandmother, and is emotionally and verbally abusive to her daughter Trixie. And then there’s Daisy, who had been shut away from the world for so long, people tend to forget she’s even there. Her heart condition reminds them of her fragility, which makes them all feel guilty and uncomfortable.

Fair warning though, the plot requires mucho suspension of disbelief. Again, it’s one of those affectations of the novel that harkens back to the Agatha Christie days, where the puzzle itself is more important than the details. As long as you can accept that, then you’ll have a lot of fun with this book and its claustrophobic, suspenseful atmosphere as the chapters gradually countdown to dawn when the tides will recede, making the island accessible again. And then there’s the final twist, which is another nod to an old classic. Cheers if you can figure it out before the big reveal, for I wouldn’t say that it was completely unexpected, but Feeney did cover her tracks really well, and by the end you will want to go back to the beginning again to see what clues you may have missed!

And of course, brava to Stephanie Racine, the narrator of the audiobook. I’ve loved her performances for the author’s other novels, and she delivered a knockout for this one as well, giving life to the characters and making this story a wonderful roller coaster ride of unforgettable surprises and twists.

Bookshelf Roundup: 07/09/22: Stacking the Shelves & Recent Reads

Bookshelf Roundup is a feature I do every weekend which fills the role of several blog memes, like Stacking the Shelves where I talk about the new books I’ve added to my library or received for review, as well as It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? where I summarize what I’ve finished reading in the last week and what I’m planning to read soon. Mostly it also serves as a recap post, so sometimes I’ll throw in stuff like reading challenge progress reports, book lists, and other random bookish thoughts or announcements.

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Reviews and content have been light this week, and I’ve also fallen behind on commenting because I’ve been feeling under the weather. I’m still not a hundred percent, but the extra downtime has allowed me to get a lot more reading done, and I hope to get all the reviews up in the following weeks.

Received for Review

My thanks to the publishers and authors for the following review copies received, and be sure to click the links to their Goodreads pages for more details and full descriptions!

This week, my haul is from the kind folks at Minotaur Books! And we start with not just one but two dog-themed books, Holy Chow by David Rosenfelt and The Lost by Jeffrey B. Burton. They’re both later installments of their respective mystery series, but I believe they can be read as a standalones. And the third book that came was Peril at the Exposition by Nev March, the second book of a historical mystery thriller series. These were all surprise arrivals, and if I can find some time this month I’d really like to try some of them, especially the doggie mysteries.

Continuing my mystery thriller streak, from Penguin Audio I received a listening copy of The Retreat by Sarah Pearse, the follow up to The Sanatorium, a locked-room remote chilly setting mystery I read last year. I wasn’t exactly swept off my feet by the first book, but apparently from the reviews I’ve seen, this one’s much better. It’s worth a try at least. From the publisher I also received a review copy of One of the Girls by Lucy Clarke, a psychological thriller following a doomed bachelorette party on an alluring Greek island. Changing to the fantasy genre, I also added a couple of late audiobook releases from May, including Her Majesty’s Royal Coven by Juno Dawson and Heroic Hearts edited by Jim Butcher and Kerrie L. Hughes.

Reviews

Legends & Lattes by Travis Baldree (3.5 of 5 stars)

What I’ve Been Reading

 

Have you heard of or read any of the books featured this week? What caught your eye? Any new discoveries? I hope you found something interesting for a future read!

Waiting on Wednesday 07/06/22

Waiting On Wednesday” is a weekly meme that first originated at Breaking the Spine but has since linked up with “Can’t Wait Wednesday” at Wishful Endings now that the original creator is unable to host it anymore. Either way, this fun feature is a chance to showcase the upcoming releases that we can’t wait to get our hands on!

Mogsy’s Pick

The Lake House by Sarah Beth Durst (April 25, 2023 by Harperteen)

I would be more wary of the fact that this was YA except I trust that anything written by Sarah Beth Durst would be amazing. In the past I’ve also enjoyed her adult fiction with crossover appeal, and I’m curious to read The Lake House because I’d like to see how she tackles mystery/thriller.

“Yellowjackets meets One of Us Is Lying in this masterful survival thriller from award-winning author Sarah Beth Durst.

Claire’s grown up triple-checking locks. Counting her steps. Second-guessing every decision. It’s just how she’s wired-her worst-case scenarios never actually come true.

Until she arrives at an off-the-grid summer camp to find a blackened, burned husk instead of a lodge-and no survivors, except her and two other late arrivals: Reyva and Mariana.

When the three girls find a dead body in the woods, they realize none of this is an accident. Someone, something, is hunting them. Something that hides in the shadows. Something that refuses to let them leave.

Irresistible and action-packed until the very final page, The Lake House will have readers glued to their seats as tension builds and danger mounts-and a final, shocking twist is revealed.”

Audiobook Review: Legends & Lattes by Travis Baldree

I received a review copy from the publisher. This does not affect the contents of my review and all opinions are my own.

Legends & Lattes by Travis Baldree

Mogsy’s Rating (Overall): 3.5 of 5 stars

Genre: Fantasy

Series: Stand Alone

Publisher: Macmillan Audio (June 14, 2022)

Length: 6 hrs and 22 mins

Author Information: Website | Twitter

Travis Baldree is a name I recognize back from playing Torchlight, and it seems in the years since his days at Runic Games he’s been keeping busy, narrating audiobooks and now authoring Legends & Lattes, a novel he describes as a low-stakes cozy fantasy.

I know it’s supremely rare to come across anything that live up to their advertised appeal, but that’s exactly what this book is—a heartwarming story that is entirely comfortable in its own skin, simply content to deliver this quiet little tale about an Orc barbarian who retires from a warrior life to open her own coffee shop.

Not much more to that, really. Readers follow Viv as she arrives in Thune, a city remarkable for its classic Dungeons & Dragons vibes and the fact that no one has ever heard of coffee. Our entrepreneurial protagonist quickly sees an opportunity to remedy that by establishing the town’s first café, but with most of her experience being in waging war and bloody battles, she has not a clue on how to build or run a business. Enter her new friends who all pitch in to lend a hand. Among them are Tandri, a succubus who brings her artistic talents and managerial assistance, and Cal, a hob carpenter who helps Viv create a sign for the shop and bestows upon it a name—Legends & Lattes.

This “slice of life” style of storytelling depicting the everyday experience of our characters suits the tone of the novel well, namely because it is completely without pretension and doesn’t claim to break new ground. Even the world, filled with its many races of humanoids and different magical creatures, would be familiar to fans of Tolkien, D&D, or World of Warcraft and the like. Plot development is on the lighter side, and any real conflict is close to non-existent.

It’s easy to see how a book like this would find an audience in today’s climate of uncertainty, when everyone is looking for escapism in comfort, some calm in the storm. Legends & Lattes might not offer much in the way of action or thrills or twists, but it’s like a warm hug in literary form. It also features interesting, authentic feeling characters who embody the true meaning of friendship, togetherness, and support. It’s cozy, it’s adorable, and it’s sweet.

If that is what you’re looking for, then I think you’ll enjoy Legends & Lattes very much. It’s definitely a mood read of a sort—like you have to be in a certain frame of mind to really get into it. For many fantasy fans, the fact that it feels so different from a lot of what’s coming out of the genre lately, that by itself is probably going to be a huge selling point, despite there being virtually no surprises, no chance of heartbreak, and no danger at all to the characters.

Refreshing as that may be, I’m going to be completely honest here—just as being a mood read can play to the book’s advantage, it can be a drawback as well. Once I got into the rhythm of the first half, realizing we were never moving much further beyond that, I found it more difficult to stay focused. I think I needed more…something. Maybe a little more excitement? Warm fuzzy feelings can only get me so far, after all.

At the end of the day, a simple story can be awesome, but still be a shallow experience. That’s not to knock Legends & Lattes too much though, because ultimately I did enjoy it a lot. It was a nice break from the hustle and bustle of most epic fantasy novels, and quite truthfully, it probably scratched an itch I didn’t even know I had. If you’re in the mood for a more stimulating read, I would suggest you look elsewhere, but if you go into this knowing what it’s all about and that it’s what you want, you will not be disappointed.

Kudos also to Travis Baldree, who not so surprisingly also narrated his own book. It’s always a treat to have author-narrated books, provided they are talented and experienced voice actors like in this case, because you know they will give you the exact audio experience they want you to have. This was a totally chill listen, perfectly wonderful and relaxing.

Bookshelf Roundup: 07/02/22: Stacking the Shelves & Recent Reads

Bookshelf Roundup is a feature I do every weekend which fills the role of several blog memes, like Stacking the Shelves where I talk about the new books I’ve added to my library or received for review, as well as It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? where I summarize what I’ve finished reading in the last week and what I’m planning to read soon. Mostly it also serves as a recap post, so sometimes I’ll throw in stuff like reading challenge progress reports, book lists, and other random bookish thoughts or announcements.

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Received for Review

My thanks to the publishers and authors for the following review copies received, and be sure to click the links to their Goodreads pages for more details and full descriptions!

With thanks to Tordotcom for sending me a copy of A Taste of Gold and Iron by Alexandra Rowland. Not my usual kind of read, but I’m sure when the mood for a queer fantasy romance strikes, I’ll be glad to have this. I was also very excited to receive a review copy of The Swell by Allie Reynolds from the kind folks at G.P. Putnum’s Sons. The same author’s debut Shiver was a thriller I absolutely loved, and I cannot wait to check out her sophomore novel. And finally, another exciting arrival, this time from Starscape. Bastille and the Evil Librarians by Brandon Sanderson and Janci Patterson is the sixth and final book of the middle grade series Alcatraz vs. the Evil Librarians and I have been waiting a long time to see how it’s going to end.

In the digital haul this week, with thanks to Simon & Schuster Audio for a listening copy of The Last to Vanish by Megan Miranda, a thriller that opens with the disappearance of a journalist investigating a string of missing persons cases in a small resort town. Also thanks to Listening Library for a listening copy of Go Hunt Me by Kelly deVos, a YA horror following a group of friends on their dream trip to a remote Romanian castle, where they end up being killed one by one. And with thanks to Harper Audio for ALCs of Eclipse the Moon by Jessie Mihalik, the next installment of her Starlight’s Shadow series, as well as The Pallbearers Club by Paul Tremblay, the author’s newest psychological thriller.

Reviews

The House Across the Lake by Riley Sager (4 of 5 stars)
Friend of the Devil by Stephen Lloyd (3 of 5 stars)

What I’ve Been Reading

Have you heard of or read any of the books featured this week? What caught your eye? Any new discoveries? I hope you found something interesting for a future read!